Neolithic Chinese 2.3 Celadon Jade Conical Pendant. Hongshan Culture c. 3000 BCE

Neolithic Chinese 2.3 Celadon Jade Conical Pendant. Hongshan Culture c. 3000 BCE
Neolithic Chinese 2.3 Celadon Jade Conical Pendant. Hongshan Culture c. 3000 BCE
Neolithic Chinese 2.3 Celadon Jade Conical Pendant. Hongshan Culture c. 3000 BCE
Neolithic Chinese 2.3 Celadon Jade Conical Pendant. Hongshan Culture c. 3000 BCE
Neolithic Chinese 2.3 Celadon Jade Conical Pendant. Hongshan Culture c. 3000 BCE
Neolithic Chinese 2.3 Celadon Jade Conical Pendant. Hongshan Culture c. 3000 BCE
Neolithic Chinese 2.3 Celadon Jade Conical Pendant. Hongshan Culture c. 3000 BCE

Neolithic Chinese 2.3 Celadon Jade Conical Pendant. Hongshan Culture c. 3000 BCE
ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS Artifacts, Antiques & Fine Collectibles. In ancient China, this translucent jade pendant/bead would have been the height of fashion and extravagance for the wealthy, upper-class man or woman that owned it. Translucent Celadon Green Nephrite Jade. Here are the approximate measurements of this tiny treasure.

This translucent, jade pendant/bead is in museum-quality condition, with no chips, repairs, or restorations. The thin, celadon-green surface of the jade is almost completely coated with white mineral deposits (likely calcium) from the soil in which it was buried. This rare and fragile ornament is for Display Only and should not be used as a modern pendant.

The items offered for sale by Ancient Civilizations are unconditionally guaranteed authentic. They were legally imported to the United States years ago and are legal to sell and own under U. Statute Title 19, Chapter 14, Code 2611, Convention on Cultural Property.

This flared jade pendant has a single hole drilled directly through the center of the pendant that would have supported a slender, cord to secure the fragile jade ornament around the wearer's neck. So, it is definitely a Neolithic pendant, and only a few examples can be found in the world's finest museums, including the MET and the British Museum. Remarkable craftsmanship was used to create this small jade decoration as it would have been difficult to shape each of the flared and conical ends and then drill a small hole through the hard jade with primitive hand tools.

It is also amazing that it has survived over 5,000 years! {See macro photos # 4-6}. I've tried to capture the beauty of this little jade gem with some indoor photos taken into a bright light so you can see the translucent, celadon green jade. The Hongshan Culture The Hongshan were temple builders and city builders who created some of the earliest nephrite jade carvings.

Their sophisticated Jade carving techniques employed technologies that exceeded simple explanations. It has recently been discovered that the Hongshan possessed the knowledge of metallurgy and employed the use of copper and iron from meteorites as tools to work their jade masterpieces. Many of the Hongshan Jade artifacts are well persevered because the Hongshan culture utilized slab burial tombs and because of the dry arid climate of Inner Mongolia. As many of you know, Nephrite jade, also known as "soft jade" or "ancient Jade" in China, was used from China's early Neolithic cultures in 8,000 BC to 1800 AD for carving all types of ritual and utilitarian items.

Nephrite, which is somewhat "softer" than the jadeite used by Neolithic Japanese and European cultures, was easier to cut, carve, polish, and drill than jadeite. So, the ancient Chinese found that Nephrite Jade could be worked by using quartz or garnet sand, polished with bamboo or jade dust, and even drilled with bone drills that used a slurry made of jade dust and water as the abrasive. During China's Neolithic Period, Hongshan Jade ritual and tomb objects were created for a period of more than 2,000 years. Hongshan jades have been discovered in large quantities with over 52 different types of Jade objects in various shapes and forms. Jade (called the "Stone of Heaven" by the Chinese) is priceless. Testifying to how much the Chinese are fond of jade is this time-honored proverb: Gold may have a price, but jade is priceless. The value of gold can be determined by measuring its weight.

The value of a piece of jade is "assessed" by taking numerous factors into account. For example, the luster, purity and color, the sound it produces when struck, and when the jade piece was discovered or when and where a jade artifact was produced can affect a piece's value. I've looked under 10x magnification under both natural and Black Light and I can find no signs of any modern tool work or repairs.

The hand tool marks left in the jade by the master stone artist who carved, shaped, and drilled this work of art appear to be consistent with those marks of other ancient jades I have examined. Each object I sell is professionally researched, translated if I can... (smile), and compared with similar objects in the collections of the finest museums in the world. When in doubt, I have worked with dozens of subject matter experts to determine the condition and authenticity of numerous antiquities and antiques.

Please examine the macro photos taken both indoors and outdoors carefully, as they are part of the description.


Neolithic Chinese 2.3 Celadon Jade Conical Pendant. Hongshan Culture c. 3000 BCE